Jan 22

Collateral Versus Standard Charge Mortgages

With some lenders moving towards collateral charge mortgages versus standard charge mortgages, it’s important to understand the diCollateral versus Standard Mortgagesfferences between a collateral and a standard charge mortgage.
The primary difference is that a collateral charge mortgage registers the mortgage for more money than you require at closing. For instance, up to 125% of the value of the home at closing with TD Canada Trust or 100% through many credit unions, instead of the amount you need to close your transaction (as is the case with a standard charge mortgage). Continue reading

Jun 25

Higher Fixed Mortgage Rates

HouseInHandBond yields are continuing to rise globally since the Fed mentioned an imminent exit from its bond purchasing program last week. The US Federal Reserve set off a dramatic spike in US borrowing costs last week after indicating a beginning withdrawal from their quantitative easing program.

This will most likely translate into higher fixed mortgage rates across the board – a continuation of last week’s rate increases. Continue reading

Jun 18

Fixed Rates Increasing

graphIt’s no secret by now that mortgage rates–particularly the 5 year fixed rate terms–have risen in the last week by as much as 20-30 Basis Points (.2% to .3%). While minor in nature compared to historical norms, affordability is being affected.

This rate increase is primarily due to falling bond market prices resulting in increase yields for quality bonds and mortgages. This, together with recent rule changes by government, has had an effect on borrowing ability for most real estate buyers and refinancers. Here are some examples of changes in today’s mortgage market:

  1. Fixed rates increasing (although variable rate mortgages are slightly decreasing)
  2. Lenders are tightening criteria for qualification, e.g. if you have a credit line, you may find that you no longer qualify for as much of a mortgage.
  3. Properties that are not “prime” and readily saleable may present problems for financing.
  4. Lower Credit Scoring and credit blemishes on a borrower’s record may prevent qualifying
  5. Self Employed Borrowers are facing more stringent criteria than before

The obvious conclusion is that these and other policy changes will reduce the number of qualified buyers, thus reducing housing demand across the country and eventually softening house prices–clearly our government’s strategy.

Will these trends continue? I can’t find anyone that knows for sure, but my recommendation remains the same. In this market, with regard to acquisition and maintenance of debt….STAY SAFE!

May 24

Reverse Mortgages

chip_logoFrom time to time I am asked about Reverse Mortgages and how they work. Our main partner in this product is ‘CHIP’ or Canadian Home Income Plan.

In order to qualify for a CHIP Reverse Mortgage, both you and your spouse must be at least age 60. The typical borrower who benefits from this program either has his home paid for or has substantial equity. With CHIP, the maximum available mortgage is limited to 40% of your home’s value and the older you are, the greater the percentage you can borrow.

With a Reverse Mortgage, you make NO PAYMENTS! That’s right, the interest portion is added to your balance and you and your spouse can live in the home until you decide to sell or the surviving spouse passes away. This type of mortgage is generally suited to the borrower who needs cash but either cannot, or would prefer not to make payments in their later years.

Interest Rates are quite affordable with CHIP and are generally speaking, very close to Bank Posted Rates. For updated rates and terms and general information, click here.

A Reverse Mortgage is not for everybody, but your Mortgage Professional at The Mortgage Centre will help if this plan is right for you. We’ll give you the valuable advice you need to make a decision about this innovative product and walk you through the process of applying for and completing your CHIP Reverse Mortgage.

Apr 27

A Prime Rate Increase Warning?

ratesThis week a few Mortgage Lenders have announced an increase in Variable Rate Mortgage Rates. The Premium under Prime Rate has been decreased (that means an increase in the rate borrowers pay on new mortgages). For example, what was priced at Prime minus .65% is now being priced at Prime minus .40%–a rate increase of .25%.

Is this a warning of an increase in Prime Rate?

It is an indication that Lenders’ costs of “Short Term” funds are increasing along with the recent increases in “longer term” rates.

Many economists have been predicting an increase in Prime Rate for as early as the May Bank of Canada rate set meeting (May 31st, 2011). With the election over and done, will Prime Rate increase after May 31st? We’ll have to wait and see.